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Health Care Heroes 2014

 
Health Care Hero

Welcome to Health Care Heroes 2014

This is the sixth year Inside Business has recognized those in the health care industry who epitomize the word “hero.”

These awards were started to salute excellence, encourage innovation, offer examples of best practices, raise awareness in the community, enhance the quality of health care and recognize deserving individuals and organizations within the industry.

Each year we have asked the public to submit nominations and a panel of judges has helped us review those submissions to select those we honor. We realize there are many in the community deserving recognition and we hope these awards raise awareness of the heroic work of the health care professionals and volunteers in Hampton Roads..


– Carol Lichti, Editor of Inside Business


The judges
Kathryn Barrett
Barrett Communications
Former WVEC-TV Medical Editor

Randolph J. Gould MD
Sentara Surgery Specialists - Leigh

Lucy Gibney MD
Dr. Lucy’s LLC

Lynne Zultanky
Administrative Director, Marketing and Public Relations
Bon Secours Hampton Roads Health System

The event
Thursday, Feb. 27, 8 to 10 a.m.
Norfolk Waterside Marriott, 235 E. Main St.

The sponsors
American Heart Association
Electronic Systems - Inside Business Enterprise sponsor

The honorees
Health Care Leader
Francis L. Counselman MD

Community Service – Patient Care
Angels of Mercy Medical Clinic

Community Service Leadership
Mark Kerner MD

Advancements in Health Care Delivery
Transitional Care Clinic, Chesapeake Regional Medical Center

Advancements in Health Care Technology
Computerized Imaging Reference System Inc.

Advancements in Health Care Innovation
Sentara Heart Hospital Blood Conservation Initiative

Corporate Achievements in Wellness
Newport News Shipbuilding

Emergency Response
William “Billy” Reynolds

Volunteer – Individual
Linda Church

Volunteer – Team
Medication Assistance Program

Corporate Achievements in Health Care
Irene Zolotorofe, RN, MS, ACNP

Health Care Staff
Elaine Lehr

Physician – Surgeon
Barry Strasnick, MD, FACS

Nurse
Denise Baylous

Nurse
Kim Moloney

Advanced Practice Clinician – Nurse Physician Assistant
Kacie Schappert

Dentist
Edward J. Houser DDS

Specialist – Infectious Disease
Edward Oldfield MD

Specialist – Dermatology
Fred Quarles MD

Specialist – Cardiology
Keith Newby MD

Specialist - Hepatology
Mitchell Shiffman MD

Specialist – Psychiatry
Sarah Bisch MD

Physician – Military Care
James Hancock MD

Physician – Pediatrician Endocrinologist
Marta Satin-Smith MD

Physicians Group – Ophthalmology
Virginia Eye Consultants

Health Care Philanthropy
Macon and Joan Brock



Scroll down to meet the honorees.
Learn more about each honoree by clicking on her name or photo.

  • Advanced Practice Clinician - Physician Assistant Kacie Schappert

    Updated: February 27, 2014 - 11:13 am

    Posted: February 21, 2014

    Children's Hospital of The King's Daughters opened its employee wellness center in October 2010 in the hopes of getting its employees healthy and by doing so reducing its health care costs.

    There are 1,900 people enrolled in the company's health plan and they all come to Kacie Schappert. With the help of a medical assistant, she sees, on average, 20 to 25 people a day.

  • Advancements in Health Care Delivery Transitional Care Clinic, Chesapeake Regional Medical Center

    Updated: February 25, 2014 - 3:27 pm

    Posted: February 21, 2014

    Nurse Practitioner Yvette Greaves remembers the man who thought he was having a heart attack. Although he had pain radiating down his arm, he tested out of the emergency room and was sent on to the Transitional Care Clinic.

    "His pulse was diminished so I ordered additional testing," Greaves said. "He had a blockage in one of the major veins running down his arm. I was able to get him into the Chesapeake Care Clinic, which got him to a vascular surgeon."

  • Advancements in Health Care Innovation Sentara Heart Hospital Blood Conservation Initiative

    Updated: February 25, 2014 - 3:14 pm

    Posted: February 21, 2014

    Advancing patient care by reducing the need for blood and blood product transfusions has been Audrey Douglas-Cooke's goal for a year. Through a team approach, the goal was reached.

    Douglas-Cooke is the vice president of Patient Care Services at Sentara Heart Hospital and Sentara Virginia Beach General.

  • Advancements in Health Care Technology Computerized Imaging Reference System Inc.

    Updated: February 25, 2014 - 3:25 pm

    Posted: February 21, 2014

    A hospital that adopts robotic-guided laser surgery technologies might claim it can track and treat moving lung tumors with sub-millimeter accuracy. But how does it test that?

    Trial and error on people may not be the best route, so the hospital might utilize products made by Norfolk-based Computerized Imaging Reference System Inc.

    CIRS produces phantoms, which are highly sophisticated anatomical models. In the case of tumors and laser beams, the company has a phantom containing data-gathering components and a tumor that can be controlled.

  • Community Service - Patient Care Angels of Mercy Medical Clinic

    Updated: February 27, 2014 - 5:32 pm

    Posted: February 21, 2014

    Although the Angels of Mercy Medical Clinic is open only two days a week, some employees are working throughout the entire week, sometimes weekends.

    The Williamsburg nonprofit offers free care to indigent, chronically ill patients, who can visit the brick building at 7151 Richmond Road on Tuesdays and Thursdays. On the other days, staff members make and take patient calls.

  • Community Service Leadership Mark Kerner MD

    Updated: February 25, 2014 - 3:23 pm

    Posted: February 21, 2014

    Bon Secours Health Center at Habour View's Millie Lancaster Women's Center opens a state-of-the art mammography room on Feb. 24, thanks in part to a $100,000 donation from Dr. Mark Kerner.

    And with the $150,000 donation he gave in 2010, Bon Secours was able to purchase Care-A-Van, a mobile primary care unit that now serves uninsured patients in Newport News, Norfolk, Portsmouth and Suffolk.

  • Corporate achievements in wellness Newport News Shipbuilding

    Updated: February 25, 2014 - 3:22 pm

    Posted: February 21, 2014

    Some companies say they care about their employees' health. Others, such as the Newport News division of Huntington Ingalls, show they care - with onsite opportunities to help employees get healthy.

    Tracy Cullinan, senior director of development with the American Heart Association, nominated the shipyard for its participation in Healthwaves, a voluntary employee program that encourages daily walking and exercise, health screenings, disease management and injury prevention.

  • Dentist Edward J. Houser DDS

    Updated: February 25, 2014 - 3:02 pm

    Posted: February 21, 2014

    After selling his dental practice six years ago, Dr. Edward Houser planned on easing into retirement by relocating to the North Carolina coast and making occasional trips overseas providing volunteer dental work.

    But after arriving in Currituck County, Houser quickly noticed the lack of dental care in his adopted community and decided volunteering close to home was just as useful.

  • Emergency response William "Billy" Reynolds

    Updated: February 25, 2014 - 5:19 pm

    Posted: February 21, 2014

    Billy Reynolds will never forget April 10, 2013. It was an unseasonably warm day with temperatures in the 90s. His wife, Tawnya, wanted to go for a 5- to 6-mile run, but he convinced her to stay at home and work out with him instead.

    At 42 years old, both Reynolds and Tawnya, of Chesapeake, run half-marathons and are into crossfit, a core strength and conditioning workout regimen. They have even turned their garage into a gym.

    It was during the sixth set of 10-rep tire lifts when Tawnya stood up.

  • Health Care Leader Francis L. Counselman MD

    Updated: February 25, 2014 - 3:25 pm

    Posted: February 21, 2014

    For years, emergency medicine has been seen as somewhat of a sub-specialty, and programs and curricula at medical schools across the country reflected that.

    But over the past several decades, as schools began realizing what goes into hospital emergency response, they began establishing emergency medicine departments. Eastern Virginia Medical School did so in 1992, thanks in part to Dr. Francis L. Counselman.

  • Health Care Philanthropy Macon and Joan Brock

    Updated: February 25, 2014 - 5:22 pm

    Posted: February 21, 2014

    Macon Brock, co-founder and chair of Dollar Tree Inc., is pretty sure his father would fall over if he knew Eastern Virginia Medical School named an institute after him.

    "He was a very kind and sympathetic man to people's health and I wanted to recognize his contributions," Brock said about the $3 million donation he and his wife, Joan, made to EVMS in his father's name.

    The medical school in Norfolk used the money to build the M. Foscue Brock Institute for Community and Global Health. It's better known as The Brock Institute.

  • Health care staff Elaine Lehr

    Updated: February 25, 2014 - 5:23 pm

    Posted: February 21, 2014

    Death is scary, especially if you're facing it alone. In her 28 years as a chaplain, Elaine Lehr has sat with a number of people as they die.

    "I've watched people do the last thing they'll ever do on the face of this earth alone," she said. "It feels important to me that somebody be there with a person who is dying."

    It's why she started the No One Dies Alone Program in November 2012 at Sentara Norfolk General Hospital where she manages four full-time and four part-time chaplains.

  • Nurse Denise Baylous

    Updated: February 25, 2014 - 3:24 pm

    Posted: February 21, 2014

    Denise Baylous has a piece of advice: Don't sweat the small stuff. As a flight nurse and manager of Nightingale Regional Air Ambulance, she knows that life can change in a minute.

    "Nightingale is a fully functional clinical care unit," she said. "Anything that can be done in the ICU, we can do in the back of the aircraft."

    Half of all calls are to transport patients from one hospital to another, the other half are to accident scenes and medical emergencies. On board there's a nurse, a paramedic and a pilot.

  • Nurse Kim Moloney

    Updated: February 25, 2014 - 3:03 pm

    Posted: February 21, 2014

    Life is too short to be eating things you hate, so Kim Moloney asks her patients, "What do you like to eat?"

    "I ask what foods they really, really love," said the 56-year-old Norfolk resident. "There's nothing you can't have. It's just all about moderation, portion size and how frequently you have it."

  • Physician - Military Care James Hancock MD

    Updated: February 25, 2014 - 3:19 pm

    Posted: February 21, 2014

    The deputy commander of Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, Capt. James Hancock MD, said his job is "all about doing God's work."

    "They don't have to pay me," said the captain, who joined the U.S. Navy as an enlisted man. "I love my job."

    Hancock's resume shows 11 deployments including five combat tours in Iraq, Afghanistan, Serbia and Kosovo. He earned a Legion of Merit and a Purple Heart. Following East Timor's independence in Southeast Asia in 2002, he served as task force surgeon.

  • Physician - Pediatrician Endocrinologist Marta Satin-Smith MD

    Updated: February 25, 2014 - 3:26 pm

    Posted: February 21, 2014

    Dr. Marta Satin-Smith, an endocrinologist at Children's Hospital of The King's Daughters understands she cannot cure children with Type 1 diabetes, but she will do her best to make sure they live a happy life despite the disease.

    Unlike Type 2 diabetes, which in many cases can be reversed, Type 1 cannot.

    Known as Dr. Marta to her patients, she started in medicine by working in a laboratory studying growth hormones.

    "I intended to go into genetics," she said.

  • Physician - Surgeon Barry Strasnick, MD, FACS

    Updated: February 25, 2014 - 3:04 pm

    Posted: February 21, 2014

    Every year, 300 to 500 children are born with hearing loss in Virginia, but the state was only identifying about 24 children before the General Assembly passed legislation authored by Dr. Barry Strasnick in 2000 requiring hearing screenings for all newborns.

    "We were missing about 90 percent," he said. "The average age of identification of hearing loss is 3 years and by that time education and social developments are greatly impaired."

  • Physicians group - Ophthalmology Virginia Eye Consultants

    Updated: February 25, 2014 - 3:14 pm

    Posted: February 21, 2014

    As Virginia Eye Consultants approached its 50th anniversary, it decided to celebrate with more than just a cake. The group donated eye surgeries to 50 individuals who needed but couldn't afford them.

    "We wanted to celebrate and thank the community," said Karen J. Spencer, chief executive officer of the practice, which has offices in Norfolk, Suffolk, Hampton and Smithfield. The thank-you resulted in 50 people having needed eye surgeries for free last August.

  • Specialist - Cardiology Keith Newby MD

    Updated: February 25, 2014 - 5:17 pm

    Posted: February 21, 2014

    Health care now is relatively disjointed, if you ask cardiologist Dr. Keith Newby.

    "I think there is a lot of repetitive testing done and there's a lot of poor coordination of care because you have these different entities, but none of them are communicating with each other," he said. "My hope was to consolidate things."

    In 2010 he developed Fort Norfolk Plaza, a $70 million city-subsidized project that houses multi-specialty medical groups.

  • Specialist - Dermatology Fred Quarles MD

    Updated: February 25, 2014 - 3:21 pm

    Posted: February 21, 2014

    Dr. Fred Quarles is a Hampton Roads dermatologist, but his affinity for treating the region is much more than skin deep.

    While Quarles complains the business side of a physician's practice often causes both doctors and patients to feel as if they're on the clock during consultations, he is adamant about bedside manner. Entering patient information into billing software is something for after hours.

    "Everybody's problem is a big problem," Quarles said. "For them to take time off work to come in, that's a big issue for them."

Post-event coverage

To view a handouts from the speaker, click this link:
Useful Websites Resource Guide.